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 Your Chance to Make a difference 
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Unread post Your Chance to Make a difference
By Abu Abdullah Al-Britani



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Your Chance to Make a difference - viewtopic.php?f=115&t=23897&start=25


Mon Apr 02, 2012 2:00 am
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Unread post Re: Reminder Of Muslim Sisters In Captivity
Jazakillah khair, Sister Bosnevie for sharing! May Allah SWT help the oppressed (against the oppressors all over the world) and end their suffering. Ameen ya rabbal 'alamin!

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Mon Apr 02, 2012 6:18 am
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Unread post Your Chance to Make a difference
Assalaam Alaikum Warahmatullahi Wabarakatuhu,

Quote:
Is ransoming Muslim prisoners using zakaah money included in the phrase (interpretation of the meaning): “and to free the captives” [al-Tawbah 9:60]?

Praise be to Allaah. Ransoming Muslim prisoners who have been captured by kaafirs is better than freeing slaves, so it is included and indeed takes priority, because they suffer great harm by being separated from their families and because of the humiliation and torture. So saving them is even more important than saving slaves.

Shaykh Ibn Jibreen.

http://islamqa.com/en/ref/20936/captive


the aseerun project


The aseerun project is a compilation of many years of effort on the part of various NGOs and individuals to document and bring attention to the policy of abuse and denigration during inhumane, more than often illegal, incarceration applied in the name of freedom, counter-terrorism or democracy.

The site and its various components appeals to humanity on three levels:

Awareness

The informative resources of past and ongoing atrocities against prisoners of the so-called ‘War on Terror,’ continuously expanded upon, serve the purpose of precipitating enlightenment, dialogue, and igniting indignation within the global community.

Advocacy

Equipped with the knowledge, tools, and passion for justice, the aseerun project hopes that the people will be moved to take action, politically challenging and socially supportive, as well as to create and broaden the scope of the discussion on human rights in general and more specifically prisoner rights.

Art

The expression of the oppressed through many mediums, both modern and classical, bridges the intellectual gap between the ideological discourse of prisoner rights and the human reality of suffering. This art is simultaneously the mechanism of documentation, coping, healing, and often the sole method of communication with the outside world, if and when they are allowed such liberties.

For more info: http://www.aseerun.org - make sure you check out the prisoner profiles and the other tabs too. The work these guys are doing is amazing, and the best part is - we can get involved... infact, I demand that we do. Come on brothers and sisters, it's time we did something for our Ummah.

______________________________________________________


CagePrisoners.com




Cageprisoners Ltd is a human rights organisation (company registration no: 6397573) that exists solely to raise awareness of the plight of the prisoners at Guantanamo Bay and other detainees held as part of the War on Terror. The site was launched in October 2003 during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan by individual Muslim volunteers who came together for the reasons set out below.

VISION


To see a return to the respect of those fundamental norms which transcend religion, societies and political theories. It is the vision of Cageprisoners that abuse of individuals and demonization of societies be eradicated completely and that respect for human rights is unequivocally promoted globally.


MISSION

To improve the circumstances and situation of political detainees worldwide, specifically those interned as a result of the War on Terror and its side campaigns.

To use our strengths and experience to work for those political detainees with focus on:

• Due process
• Equal/non-discriminatory application of the law
• Enforcement of basic rights globally
• Fair trials using evidence of internationally required standards
• Badly drafted legislation which criminalises dissent and prosecutes dissenting members of the Muslim community – targeting the process which makes them ‘detainees’


STRENGTHS

The work carried out by Cageprisoners requires that the following values be adhered to in order to serve the interests of those that have been detained:

Prisoner understanding – one of the major assets of Cageprisoners, is the role which its staff and volunteers play in understanding the detainees themselves. Often organisations do not understand the cultural, religious or social needs of those they try and represent; thus Cageprisoners stands as a bridge between the detainees and possible solutions they may be able to benefit from in the legal and political world. Further, the ethos of the organisation requires that no action be taken which would be offensive to the detainee, to always try and work within the way those detained would have us represent them.

Common understanding – With Muslim communities around the world being targeted by the global ‘War on Terror’ a response is required that brings together the Islamic world with the non-Islamic one. Cageprisoners relies on Islamic doctrines relating to due process to highlight in the Muslim world the same policies that exist in the non-Muslim one; by doing so that aim is to reach a common understanding of what is at stake in terms of human behaviour and how to promote a return to human rights.

Due process – It is not only the right to a fair trial that Cageprisoners promotes, rather the morality of the law. Thus even though national legislation in various jurisdictions may be given a veneer of legality, in reality they go against the conscience of the law. Thus our understanding of due process goes to the very heart of the counter-terrorism policies that are implemented, whether legally or illegally.


PRINCIPLES

Cageprisoners is not an advocacy organisation and consequentially does not seek to make representations on behalf of individuals in courts of law. However, the organisation seeks to highlight individual cases in order to draw attention to entire classes of detainees due to a dearth of resources.

Pragmatism plays an important role in the way we conduct our work – impact for those detained guides the way in which we conduct our campaigns in the hope of providing relief to a larger class of detainee. By pragmatism it is meant that by selectively choosing cases based on our resources the objectives of the organisation can be reached for others beyond the individual case.



OPERATIONAL OVERVIEW

Cageprisoners uses the language and understanding of international human rights and humanitarian law in order promote the rights of detainees around the world.

The organisation operates in a number of different ways with the stated purposes:

1. EDUCATE the public by being a comprehensive resource of information on Guantanamo Bay and other detainees held as part of the War on Terror highlighting their plight and ensuring that they are never forgotten.

2. CAMPAIGN for the repatriation or asylum for the Guantanamo Bay detainees in particular and that other prisoners around the world are treated within the civilised norms of justice, and to ensure that they are given their due rights namely:
• the right to humane treatment and conditions
• the right not to be tortured
• the right not to be detained indefinitely
• the right not to be disappeared
• the right to open fair civilian trials
• the right to legal representation
• the right of access to the Red Cross and medical personnel
• the right of access to their families.

3. PREVENT similar treatment of other communities in the future by developing, building and placing political, legal and social infrastructures.


ISLAMIC ETHOS

One of the main reasons that Cageprisoners was instituted was due to its ability to reach the Muslim community by understanding its needs from a very personal perspective. Our understanding of the religious aspects of this work and the victims we seek to help has given us a position of responsibility that other organisations are not able to take advantage of. It is thus important that we continue our work bearing in mind the needs of the Muslim communities and the way they would wish to see us work in order that we do not alienate them.

Despite the above, it is important to also remember that we work towards human rights which are transcendental to religion, politics or culture. We seek to help people who have been denied any form of due process and that must be a driving force in our interactions with colleagues and other organisations. Further this also means that Cageprisoners will not restrict itself to only employing or taking on Muslim interns – we recognise that what we work towards has relevance to the promotion of justice and due process regardless of individual backgrounds or beliefs.

For more information, please visit http://www.cageprisoners.com and for the families of Muslim prisoners they also have this site too: http://www.hhugs.org.uk
______________________________________________________


Also, islamicawakening forum has a whole section on Muslim Prisoners and Detainess... http://forums.islamicawakening.com/f47/

I will update you more, in due course. But for the meantime, get yourselves familiarised with some of the cases we are working to improve insha-Allah...

Like the case of Sister Aafia Siddiqui, if you are strong enough to handle it:

Quote:
BACKGROUND

Dr. Aafia Siddiqui was born on 2 March 1972 in Karachi, Pakistan. She is one of three siblings. Aafia’s father Mohammad Siddiqui was a UK-trained doctor and her mother, Ismet, is a homemaker. Aafia has three children: Ahmed (b. 1996), Maryam (b. 1998), and Suleman (b. 2002), the latter of whom remains missing to this day.

Aafia moved to Texas in 1990 to be near her brother, and after spending a year at the University of Houston, transferred to Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Siddiqui's fellow students say she was a quiet, studious woman who was devout in her religious beliefs but far from the media characterisation of 'Lady Qaeda'. A fellow student, Hamza, recalled in an interview with the BBC, "I remember Aafia as being sweet, mildly irritating but harmless".

During her time at MIT, Aafia joined the campus Muslim Student Association (MSA) and was actively involved in efforts to portray the teachings of Islam to non-Muslims in order to better their understanding of her faith and invite them to Islam. Her emphasis in her life on bettering the conditions of Muslims even pervaded her academic achievements. During her sophomore year at MIT, she won a grant of $5,000 to study the effects of Islam on women living in Pakistan. In addition to her many academic achievements, Aafia earned the honourable status of committing the entire Qur’an to memory.

Following her graduation, Aafia married a medical student Mohammed Amjad Khan. She subsequently entered Brandeis University as a graduate student in cognitive neuroscience. Citing the difficulty of living as Muslims in the United States after 9/11 and following FBI harassment of her husband, Aafia and her husband returned to Pakistan. They stayed in Pakistan for a short time, and then returned to the United States. They remained there until 2002, and then moved back to Pakistan. Some problems developed in their marriage, and Aafia was eight months pregnant with their third child when she and Khan were separated. She and the children stayed at her mother’s house, while Khan lived elsewhere in Karachi. After giving birth to her son, Aafia stayed at her mother’s house for the rest of the year, returning to the US without her children around December 2002 to look for a job in the Baltimore area, where her sister had begun working at Sinai Hospital. On 1 March 2003, Pakistani authorities arrested Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, Aafia and her children disappeared just 27 days later.


DISAPPEARANCE

According to Aafia’s mother, Aafia left their home in Gulshan-e-Iqbal in a Metro-cab on 28 March, 2003 to catch a flight to Rawalpindi, but never reached the airport. In February 2010 Aafia’s eldest son returned to the scene and described how, when he, his mother and siblings came out of their home, fifteen to twenty people, including a ‘white lady’ and members of the ISI, were waiting in three to four vehicles on the next street and subsequently kidnapped them. Aafia was placed into one black car and the crying children into another. She described to her lawyer that she was immediately hooded and drugged. When she awoke she was tied to a gurney in a place that could not have been Karachi because the air was very dry.

Following her trial, Aafia’s lawyer Elaine Sharpe, described how Aafia’s baby, Suleman, was believed to have been killed during the arrest. Dr Siddiqui was later shown a picture of her baby, lying in a pool of blood. It is not known if Suleman, who would now be 7 years old, is alive.

Pakistani papers mentioned reports the following day that a woman had been taken into custody of terrorism charges and confirmation came from a Pakistan Interior Ministry spokesman. The media reported that Aafia Siddiqui had been 'picked up in Karachi by an intelligence agency' and 'shifted to an unknown place for questioning'. A year later, the press quoted a Pakistani government spokesman who said that she had been handed over to US authorities in 2003.

Aafia Siddiqui had been missing for more than a year when the FBI put her photographs on its website.

Aafia’s mother described in a BBC interview in 2003, how a 'man wearing a motor-bike helmet' which he did not remove, arrived at the family residence and warned her that if she ever wanted to see her daughter and grandchildren again, she should keep quiet. Both the Pakistan government as well as US officials in Washington denied any knowledge of Aafia’s custody. Aafia's sister, Fowzia also says that she was told by the then Interior Minister Syed Faisal Saleh Hayat in 2004 that Aafia had been released and would return home soon

At almost precisely the same time that Aafia went missing, two other alleged Al Qaeda suspects disappeared from Karachi - Majid Khan and 'Ali 'Abd al-'Aziz 'Ali. They would be amongst hundreds arrested by the Pakistani intelligence services and handed over to the FBI and CIA as part of the War on Terror. Like Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, Khan and Ali would not reappear again until September 2006, following their transfer from CIA custody, where they were reportedly tortured including the use of waterboarding, to Guantanamo.


SECRET DETENTION

Aafia claims that she was kidnapped by the Pakistani intelligence services with her children and transferred into US custody. She further alleges that she was detained in a series of secret prisons for five years during which time she was repeatedly abused, tortured and raped. Aafia’s claim is substantiated by former Bagram detainees who affirmed the presence of a female detainee of Pakistani origin at Bagram, with the prisoner ID “650”. The International Committee for the Red Cross also confirmed that a woman had been detained at Bagram. Immediately after his release from Guantanamo in 2009, ex-Bagram detainee, Binyam Mohamed declared that the woman he saw in Bagram, with the prison no. 650, was indeed Aafia Siddiqui.

The US has previously denied the presence of female detainees in Bagram and that Aafia was ever held there, bar for medical treatment (after they shot her) in July 2008.

Little is known about what happened to Aafia and her children in the five years in which they were missing. However, in October 2009, when Aafia was visited by a Pakistani parliamentary delegation she spoke a little about the five years in which she had been disappeared, saying “I have been through living hell”. She described being given an injection and when she came to, she was in a cell. She said she was being brainwashed by men who spoke perfect English, who may have been Afghans. She did not think they were Pakistanis. She described being forced to make false confessions and sign statements. She alleged that she had been tortured although she provided no details. She was also told by her captors that if she did not co-operate, her children would suffer. During her trial, Aafia alluded to being tortured in secret prisons, to being raped, her children being tortured, and being threatened to be “sent back to the bad guys” – men she described as sounding like Americans but could not be “real Americans” but “pretend Americans” due to the treatment they had subjected her to. After her trial it emerged that the government of Pakistan had put a gag order on Aafia’s family in exchange for releasing her eldest son Ahmed.

Aafia's lawyers, Elaine Sharpe and Elizabeth Fink, would later corroborate this by stating publicly that she had "been through years of detention, whose interrogators were American, who endured treatment fairly characterised as horrendous" and that she had been "tortured".


RE-ARREST IN AFGHANISTAN

On 7 July 2008, a press conference led by British journalist Yvonne Ridley, in Pakistan resulted in mass international coverage of Aafia’s case as her disappearance was questioned by the media and political figures in Pakistan. Within weeks, the US administration reported that she was arrested by Afghani forces along with her 13 year old son, outside the governor of Ghazni’s compound, allegedly with manuals on explosives and ‘dangerous substances in sealed jars’ on her person. Her lawyers claim that the evidence was planted on her. Aafia would later testify during her trial that the bag in which the evidence was found was not her own and was given to her, being unaware of its contents. She also claimed that the handwritten notes were forcibly copied from a magazine under threat of torture of her children. She recalledthe presence of a boy at the Ghazni police station whom she believed could have been her son, but could not know with certainty since they had been separate for several years.

On 3 August 2008 an agent from the FBI visited the home of her brother in Houston, Texas and confirmed that she was being detained in Afghanistan. On Monday 4 August 2008, federal prosecutors in the US confirmed that Aafia Siddiqui had been extradited to the US from Afghanistan where they alleged she had been detained since mid-July 2008. They further allege that whilst in custody she fired at US officers (none being injured) and was herself shot twice in the process. Aafia confirmed during her trial that she was hiding behind a curtain in the prison, as the US claim, with the intent of escaping as she feared being returned to a secret prison, but categorically denied picking up the gun or attempting to shoot anyone. Aafia was charged in the US with assaulting and attempted murder of US personnel in Afghanistan.



RELEASE OF AHMED SIDDIQUI

In late August 2008, Michael G Garcia, the US attorney general of the southern region confirmed in a letter to Dr Fowzia Siddiqui that Aafia’s son, Ahmed had been in the custody of the FBI since 2003 and was he was currently in the custody of the Karzai government. Earlier the US ambassador to Pakistan, Anne W Patterson had earlier claimed that Washington has no information regarding the children.

According to an Afghan Interior Ministry official quoted in the Washington Post, Ahmed Siddiqui was briefly held by the Interior Ministry after his arrest in July 2008 and was thereafter transferred to an Afghan intelligence agency, the National Directorate of Security (NDS), notorious for its brutal treatment of detainees, despite the fact he was too young to be treated as a criminal suspect under both Afghan and international law. Under Afghanistan's Juvenile Code, the minimum age of criminal responsibility is 13 and according to the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child a minimum age of criminal responsibility below the age of 12 is "not internationally acceptable."

Ahmed was finally released to the custody of Aafia’s family in Pakistan in September 2009.

He later gave a statement to police in Lahore, Pakistan, that he had been held in a juvenile prison in Afghanistan for years. On being reunited with his father for the first time, he ran away screaming in horror, claiming that his father was amongst those who used to beat him in Afghanistan.


THE TRIAL

The trial of Aafia Siddiqui began Tuesday 19 January 2010, in a Manhattan federal courtroom. Prior to the jury entering the courtroom, Aafia turned to onlookers saying; "This isn't a fair court, (...) Why do I have to be here? (...) There are many different versions of how this happened," referring to the alleged shooting.

Three government witnesses testified on the opening day of the trial; Army Capt. Robert Snyder, John Threadcraft, a former army officer and John Jefferson, an FBI agent. Both were stationed in Afghanistan at the time of the alleged assault and murder attempt.

During the trial, while Snyder testified that Aafia had been arrested with a handwritten note outlining plans to attack the Empire State Building, the Brooklyn Bridge and Wall Street, Aafia disrupted the proceedings with a loud outburst aimed at Snyder, after, which she proclaimed her innocence stating; "Since I'll never get a chance to speak, if you were in a secret prison.. where children were tortured... This is no list of targets against New York. I was never planning to bomb it. You're lying."

In the morning before the closing remarks, the last government witness, FBI Special Agent, Angela Sercer testified. Sercer monitored Aafia for 12 hours a day over a two week period while she was at a hospital in Bagram. She tried to rebut Aafia Siddiqui’s testimony, by saying that Aafia told her she was in “hiding” for the last five years and further that she “married” someone to change her name.

However under cross examination, Sercer admitted that while at the hospital Aafia expressed fear of “being tortured”. Sercer also admitted that Aafia expressed concern about the “welfare of the boy” and asked about him “every day”. Moreover, that Aafia only agreed to talk to her upon promises that the boy would be safe. According to the testimony Aafia said that the Afghans had “beaten her”; that her “husband had beaten her and her children”; and that she was “afraid of coming into physical harm”.

When Sercer was further questioned about what Aafia said about her children during that two week period, she admitted that Aafia expressed concern about the “safety and welfare of her children”, but felt that the “kids had been killed or tortured in a secret prison”. “She said that they were dead, didn’t she” asked Defence attorney, Elaine Sharpe; reluctantly Sercer answered, “Yes.”

The trial took an unusual turn with an FBI official asserting that the finger prints taken from the rifle, which was purportedly used by Aafia to shoot at the U.S. interrogators, did not match hers. Another event complicated the case further, when the testimony of witness Masood Haider Gul appeared different from the one given by U.S. Captain Schnieder earlier. The defence denied all charges, stating that "the soldiers had given different versions of where she was when the M-4 was allegedly fired and how many shots were fired."

The trial lasted for 2 weeks and the jury deliberated for 2 days before reaching a verdict. On February 3, 2010, she was convicted and found guilty on all counts. , despite the following discrepancies:

· The court proceedings were flawed, and limited to the incident in Ghazni, which itself lacked concrete evidence.

· It is still unexplained how a frail, 110 pound woman, confronted with three US army officers, two interpreters and two FBI agents managed to assault three of them, snatch a rifle from one of them, open fire at close range, hit no one, but she herself was wounded.

· There were no fingerprints on the gun.

· There was no gunshot residue from the gun.

· There were no bullet holes in the walls from that particular gun.

· There were no bullets cases or shells in the area from the specified gun.

· The testimony of the government’s six eyewitnesses contradicted each other.

· The statements Aafia made to FBI agent Angela Sercer were made whilst she was under 24 hour surveillance by FBI agents in the hospital at Bagram, with her arms and legs tied to a bed for weeks, several types of meidcation, sleep-deprived and at the mercy of the agent for food, water and in order to relieve herself. Sercer did not identify herself to Aafia as a FBI agent. The use of these statements in court were objected to by the defence on the basis of ‘Miranda laws’ which mandate that a detainee must be informed of their rights, have access to an attorney, or in the case of international law, consular staff and law enforcement officials must identify themselves. Despite this the judge denied the motion and allowed this to form part of the questioning.

· Aafia’s disappearance, torture and missing children were not at all addressed during the court case.



POST CONVICTION

Following her conviction, Aafia remained at the Metropolitan Detention Centre in New York where she has spent the best part of her detention in the US. Throughout that time, she has been subject to humilitating and degrading strip and cavity searches, prompting her to refuse legal visits on many occasions. Since the beginning of March Aafia has been refused all contact with her family and has not been permitted any letters, phonecalls, visits or reading material under the pretext of “the security of the nation.”

In April 2010, a 12 year old girl was left outside the resident of Fowzia Siddiqui in Karachi by unidentified men claiming she was the missing daughter of Aafia Siddiqui. Although initially it was thought that she was not Aafia's daughter, following DNA tests conducted by the Pakistani government, the Interior Minister Rehman Malik confirmed that the tests proved that the child was indeed Aafia's daughter, Maryam, and that her DNA matched that of Ahmed Siddiqui (Aafia's eldest son) and their father, Amjad Khan. Dr Fowzia intended to carry out their own independent investigation to confirm the girl's identity. In a press conference Senate Committee for Interior Chairman, Senator Talha Mehmood reported that Maryam Siddiqui was recovered from Bagram airbase in the custody of an American - in the Urdu-language press, an American soldier - called "John". He also said that she had been kept for seven years in a 'cold, dark room' in Bagram airbase.

After several postponements, Aafia was finally sentenced to 86 years in prison, on 5 counts, on September 23rd 2010, making her eligible for release in 2094. She would be 122 years old at the time of her release, if she remains alive at that time.

The whereabouts and welfare of Aafia’s youngest son, Suleman remains a mystery.

http://justiceforaafia.org/about-aafia


A list of cases are to be found here: http://aseerun.org/cases/

I'll be back soon insha-Allah, with more.

You woke up... isn't it time you learnt how to stand up too? Think about it, I did.

Scimi


Mon Apr 09, 2012 11:24 am
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Unread post Re: Your Chance to Make a difference
Great post :) we should all become more involved.

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Unread post Re: Your Chance to Make a difference
SubhanAllah, excelllent post brother Scimi- unfortunately, list of such cases of Cageprosoners should be extended with more cases, from Bosnia: several brothers from arabian countries are imprisoned in the jail in Istočno Sarajevo ( "serbian Sarajevo" ) because they are considered as danger to national security. And only case of Abdulkadir Cesur is mentioned on Cageprisoners.

JazakAllah khayren for posting:) Let´s not forget them-same thing can happen to everybody, to us, our children.

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Your Chance to Make a difference - viewtopic.php?f=115&t=23897&start=25


Last edited by bosnevie on Tue Apr 10, 2012 9:38 am, edited 1 time in total.



Tue Apr 10, 2012 7:19 am
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Unread post Re: Your Chance to Make a difference
SIGN PETITION!!!!!

For our dear Brother Shaker Aamer....



About Shaker:

“I am dying here every day, mentally and physically.
This is happening to all of us.
We have been ignored, locked up in the middle of the ocean for many years.”
(letter written in 2006 by Shaker Aamer, Internment Serial Number (ISN) 239 )
Shaker Aamer, the last British Resident in Guantanamohas been held without charge or trial for over eight years. President Obama promised to close Guantanamoby January 2010, and restore the US to the rule of law. However, Guantanamostill remains open with the remaining detainees losing hope of an end to an ordeal in which all their human rights have been denied. Shaker Aamer was cleared for release by the Bush Administration in June 2007. In January 2010, the Obama Task Force Review re-affirmed that decision. In August 2007 the UK Government, recognised Shaker’s right to return as a long-term resident and requested his release to the UK. This request was “strenuously” repeated on subsequent occasions. David Cameron stated, in July 2010, that the Coalition Government will continue to request Shaker’s release. Jane Ellison MP, the new MP for Battersea has continued the work of her predecessor, Martin Linton, in calling for Shaker’s return to his wife and four young children and family home in Battersea. It is beyond belief that Shaker Aamer is still detained in Guantanamo. The lack of any news of Shaker is hard to bear for his family and friends. Shaker has done no wrong, but he has been greatly wronged by the shameful inaction of the UK/US Governments. He has suffered cruel and inhuman treatment including many years incarcerated in solitary confinement in a cell, 6 foot by 8 foot. Shaker’s mental and physical health is a cause of great concern. The Save Shaker Aamer Campaign calls on the US and UK to act with extreme urgency to bring Shaker home NOW.

SHAKER AAMER’S STORY
Shaker Aamer, was born on 12 December 1968 in Medina, Saudi Arabia. He left home aged 17, lived in America for a year and travelled to many countries before he made his home in the UK. In 1996, he was granted legal right to remain in the UKand worked as a translator for a firm of solicitors. His application for British Citizenship was in progress when Shaker, his wife and young family decided to travel to Afghanistan to work on charitable projects, notably supporting a girl’s school and digging wells. He arrived in June 2001 to join his friend Moazzam Begg in a shared house in Kabul. After 9/11, in October 2001, the US and UK started bombing Afghanistan. Shaker sent his family on to safety. As he tried to follow them, he was betrayed by Afghani villagers to the Northern Alliance, tortured, and then sold for a bounty of $5000 to the US. He was taken to the “dark” prison in Kabul, where he suffered unspeakable torture, and then transferred to Bagram and Kandahar for further abuse. Shaker states that he was subjected to cruel torture and coercive interrogation in the presence of M15/M16 agents. In February 2002 he was amongst the first detainees to be transported to Guantanamo, in orange suits, chains, ear-muff, shackles, blind-folds and nappies. There he has continued to suffer acts of cruelty, torture and deprivation. Shaker protested against the harsh conditions and soon became a respected spokesperson for the other detainees. Following his role in a major hunger strike in June/ July 2005, he organised a Prisoner’s Council. All requests for improvements were denied and to silence him, Shaker was put into solitary confinement for the following five years.

TORTURE
“No one shall be subjected to torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. No-one shall be subjected to arbitrary arrest, detention or exile.” (Articles 5 and 9 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights) Shaker has stated that, in Bagram, in December 2001, he was beaten and forced to stand for nine days without food or medication for his swollen feet and that his head was slammed repeatedly against a wall in the presence of UK agents. The CIA Torture Memos detailed Enhanced Interrogation Techniques endorsed by *#&% Cheney for use in Guantanamo, including, yelling, slapping, stress positions, extremes of heat and cold, constant bright lights, permanent noise and constantly repeated music, food, sleep and sensory deprivation, long periods of total solitary confinement, removal of facial hair, removal of blanket, clothes, toothbrush etc, forced nudity, and forced feeding, sexual assault, water-boarding and suffocation in a narrow box, prolonged shackling of hands and feet, threats to family, exposure to dogs, insects etc, denial of exercise or daylight. All these practices are in breach of international law. Shaker’s US lawyer Brent Mickum has stated, “Shaker is still being tortured down there. Shaker has been jailed as long as anyone, undergoing regular torture from beating to food and sleep deprivation. There isn’t a shred of evidence against him.”

JUSTICE DENIED
On the night of June 9 2006, three Guantanamo detainees suffocated and died and were said to have committed suicide. In a sworn affidavit to his lawyer, Shaker stated that, the same night, he was brutally beaten for over two hours. He was half-suffocated with rags stuffed in his mouth. It is possible that he witnessed the torture of the other men. It is known that, in July 2009, Shaker was assaulted by guards in riot gear, which prevented him attending an interview with his lawyer. There are reports that he has resisted attempts to make him board a flight to Saudi Arabia. Shaker’s only wish is to be returned home to his family. In December 2009, documents previously withheld by the Government, which support Shaker’s allegations of torture, were handed over to his US lawyers. In February 2010, the UK Metropolitan Police were asked to investigate allegations that the UK Security Services were complicit in his torture. But despite all of the above, Shaker Aamer is still in Guantanamo. In July 2010, the Coalition Government announced that there is to be a judge-led inquiry into the many allegations by UK Citizens and Residents of UK complicity in torture abroad. Shaker Aamer should be a prime witness at such an inquiry. It would be a travesty of justice if such an inquiry takes place and Shaker remains in Guantanamo.

=================================================================

Shaker Aamer's family appealing urgently for assistance to promote a parliamentary e-petition calling for a parliamentary debate about the British government's failure to affect Shaker Aamer's return to the United Kingdom from Guantanamo Bay.

Shaker Aamer is a British resident with a British wife and children who has been imprisoned without trial by the US in Bagram Airforce Base and Guantanamo Bay for over ten years. The Foreign Secretary and the Foreign Office must undertake urgent new initiatives to achieve the immediate transfer of Shaker Aamer to the UK from continuing indefinite detention in Guantanamo Bay

How you can help
Make your voice heard in Westminster by signing this e-petition calling for an urgent parliamentary debate on Shaker Aamer's case. You can do it online at Return Shaker Aamer to the UK - e-petitions

You can also Help collect signatures for the e-petition from your community using the printable templates which can be downloaded her:

http://saveshaker.org/wp-content/upload ... ion29410sh

Here is the petition:

http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/29410


Quote:
Abu Hurairah (May Allah be pleased with him) reported: The Prophet (sa) said:

"He who removes from a believer one of his difficulties of this world, Allah will remove one of his troubles on the Day of Resurrection; and he who finds relief for a hard-pressed person, Allah will make things easy for him on the Day of Resurrection; he who covers up (the faults and sins) of a Muslim, Allah will cover up (his faults and sins) in this world and in the Hereafter. Allah supports His slave as long as the slave is supportive of his brother..." [Muslim]

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All humans are dead except those who have knowledge; and all those who have knowledge are asleep, except those who do good deeds; and those who do good deeds are deceived, except those who are sincere; and those who are sincere are always in a state of worry
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VISIT: !!!!!!
http://forums.islamicawakening.com/f47
http://freedetainees.org
http://aseerun.org
http://cageprisoners.com
http://hhugs.org.uk/


Tue Apr 10, 2012 8:10 am
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bosnevie wrote:
SubhanAllah, excelllent post borther Scimi- unfortunately, list of such cases of Cageprosoners should be extended with more cases, from Bosnia: several brothers from arabian countries are imprisoned in the jail in Istočno Sarajevo ( "serbian Sarajevo" ) because they are considered as danger to national security. And only case of Abdulkadir Cesur is mentioned on Cageprisoners.

JazakAllah khayren for posting:) Let´s not forget them-same thing can happen to everybody, to us, our children.



JazakAllah Khair for your post too (smiles).

Sister, you can help to bring these other cases to light. Infact, I happen to know that the owners of the sites listed above, are in dire need of people to create as much awareness of as many Muslim detainees as possible. How can you help? Sister, all you have to do is go to their sites and join up. Then post the info. They will look into it with their extensive network, and once the case has been determined, it will be put up with the rest inshaAllah.

NOTE: it is NOT illegal to support Muslim prisoners, in fact, many non faith groups already do this - where are our voices? Many Muslims have been detained with no charge, for years on end. A blatant disregard for human rights by these oppressors, should not silence our voices...

...the one who stands for nothing, will fall for anything. Let's make something happen. let's do something for our Ummah.

Robin, well done for joining the effort bro.

Scimi


Last edited by Scimitar on Tue Apr 10, 2012 9:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Tue Apr 10, 2012 8:29 am
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If you want to keep updated for more news about the prisoners or more info

here a few sites:

http://forums.islamicawakening.com/f47
http://freedetainees.org
http://aseerun.org
http://cageprisoners.com

and http://hhugs.org.uk/


VISIT THESE SITES OFTEN!! So they get more attention, also share those sites with your friends, family and other brothers and sisters so they become aware!

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All humans are dead except those who have knowledge; and all those who have knowledge are asleep, except those who do good deeds; and those who do good deeds are deceived, except those who are sincere; and those who are sincere are always in a state of worry
- Imam Shafi (r.a)



VISIT: !!!!!!
http://forums.islamicawakening.com/f47
http://freedetainees.org
http://aseerun.org
http://cageprisoners.com
http://hhugs.org.uk/


Tue Apr 10, 2012 9:18 am
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MashaAllah, I´ve just shared those links on my fb profile... This e-petition for return of brother Shaker, is for UK citizen only ...

Do they cover exile cases?

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Your Chance to Make a difference - viewtopic.php?f=115&t=23897&start=25


Tue Apr 10, 2012 9:52 am
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Salaam sister,

there are many case studies on the websites. I'm checking out the adopt a prisoner thread on globalvoiceforjustice at the moment.

This is looking really good Alhamdulillah.

Scimi


Tue Apr 10, 2012 11:33 am
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Reaction by Shaker Aamer


This article is the second of two articles providing new commentary by Shaker Aamer, the last British resident in Guantánamo — and reproducing a statement he made about conditions in the prison, with additional notes by Ramzi Kassem, one of his lawyers.



The two articles were published simultaneously — here and on the website of the “Close Guantánamo” campaign, and this is a cross-post of the article published on “Close Guantánamo.” Also, if you’re interested in seeing Shaker Aamer freed from Guantánamo, please sign the e-petition to the British government calling for his release (if you’re a UK citizen or resident — whatever your age), and the international petition on the Care 2 Petition Site, which will be delivered to both the US and UK governments.



In a letter dated July 15, 2011, which has recently been unclassified by the Pentagon, Shaker Aamer, the last British resident in Guantánamo, explained why he was embarking on a peaceful protest, which also involved a hunger strike. These reasons are posted below, because they provide a compelling snapshot of the current conditions in the prison, touching on the injustice of holding people for nine years — now ten — without charge or trial, so that they can be legitimately regarded as hostages; preventing them from having contact with their families; and not meeting their needs regarding healthcare and diet. He also criticized President Obama administration for not keeping his promise to close Guantanamo within a year of taking office.



These complaints are valid for all the prisoners still held at Guantánamo (171 in total), but from what we understand, Shaker Aamer is one of 89 prisoners who are still held despite being cleared for release over two years ago by an interagency Task Force established by President Obama. This, of course, is an absolute disgrace, and in Shaker’s case it is compounded by the fact that he was first told he was cleared under President Bush in 2007, and the British government has also been seeking his return for the last five years.



Following the points raised in the letter, below, Ramzi Kassem, a law professor at the City University of New York, who is one of Aamer’s attorneys, explained that, on a visit in January, his client described what took place during the widespread peaceful protest and hunger strike on the tenth anniversary of the opening of Guantánamo (on January 11 this year), and provided further background information regarding his complaints about the food and the lack of communication with his family, and also his frank and obviously very real fears about being killed.



SUBJECT: Peaceful Protest



From GTMO detainee to his lawyer.



I the signatory below, in Camp 5E ["Five Echo," described here] announce the start of a peaceful protest/hunger strike for the reasons enumerated below:



1. The opening and continuing operation of this unjust detention facility for the ninth year of my continuing and indefinite detention in the absence of any real accusation or crimes committed. Therefore I am hostage.



2. The inhumane treatment and deprivation of some of the items we are truly in need of, most important of which are the family calls since they are most critical to our families, especially to those experiencing special circumstances. Therefore, I want these calls to take place on a continuing basis and recur once every 15 days. These family calls ought to last no less than 2 hours with further consideration given to those experiencing special circumstances. I also speak for the regular mail to be made more efficient and provide us with e-mail.



3. The inhumane treatment is taking place at the hospital among other areas especially affecting the sick and those who are on strike and our deprivation of real treatment, health diet and appropriate clothing which are not provided to us nor are we allowed to provide them for ourselves.



4. Not upholding the promise that both your president and government gave on 01/21/2009 concerning the closing of Guantánamo detention facility. Very few people have left ever since although many here have been deemed to not represent any danger for the United States. Therefore, I ask you to establish justice and remove the injustice that has befallen us and our brothers in all detention centers.



By submitting these demands, I affirm our right to life. We want our freedom and the right to return to our homes since I am innocent of the charges (if there were any) you have levied against us. I ask that you establish justice that you claim to be a foundation of your country.



After these years of hardship we have spent here — and which I managed to do only through the grace of God, otherwise I would have lost my sanity — I want you to consider my case as soon as possible and give me the right to a just and public trial or set me free without conditions.



Shaker Aamer (00239)



*****



Following this letter, Aamer was instrumental in organizing a peaceful hunger strike and protest on the tenth anniversary of the opening of the prison, on January 11 this year, which I reported here.



In a meeting with Ramzi Kassem on January 27, he explained that he and another prisoner were “on punishment status” during the week of the anniversary. With an eye for symbolism, they had asked to be issued with orange jumpsuits, which were worn by all the prisoners in the early days of Guantánamo, but were then issued only to prisoners “on punishment status.” However, the Joint Task Force refused, and Shaker found it ironic that refusing to allow the orange jumpsuits to be used was “part of an effort to whitewash the prison’s image.”



He complained that, despite claims that the prisoners are all fed well, the food is, in fact, “all mixed up together: the tuna mixed with the fruit salad, the eggs mixed with the oatmeal.” And then, he said, “there’s the thick, heavy, oddly non-circular shaped pseudo-falafel,” which he has taken to calling the “constipation cube.” He has explained that you could “throw it against a wall and it wouldn’t crumble apart.” As he stated: “You gonna be clogged up. No way you gonna go to the bathroom.”



Aamer explained that the quality of the food improved slightly in the first half of January, in an evidently cynical attempt to keep the prisoners calm on the anniversary, but then became as inedible as ever — so inedible, as Aamer said, that “sometimes even the stray cats he cares for during his recreation time won’t touch it.”



He also explained his fears — that he doesn’t feel safe without the constant presence of attorneys, and the constant threat of embarrassment in the media directed at the prison authorities. Only then, he said, does he believe there will there be “a meaningful check” on the abuse of prisoners.



He has said that he fears for his life, and fears that if, in the course of a “Forced Cell Extraction” by the notorious Immediate Reaction Force (the armored guards responsible for maintaining discipline and punishing infringements of the rules), the guards kill him, they will tell the world it was a suicide. Who knows, he has asked, if the men that the authorities claimed committed suicide truly had — the three men who died in 2006, and the others in 2007, 2009 and 2011? What, he wonders, if, instead of killing him, they paralyze him during one of their brutal beatings?



Touching on one of his major complaints in his letter of July 2011, Aamer stated that he has not been allowed to communicate with his wife and their children in London since a videoteleconference (VTC) arranged by the International Committee of the Red Cross on August 12, 2011, and another with his mother and relatives immediately after Ramadan. The ICRC told him there would be another VTC with his family in December 2011, but that call never took place, and he wonders why. He also wonders why his brother and his family haven’t written to him, or if they know where to send letters.



He also fears that his letters to his family in the UK are not being sent, and has stated that he would like his attorney to find out how many of his letters have been received. Sadly, he has not received any letters from his wife in three years, with the exception of a single letter delivered by the British government via military lawyers for the prison authorities at GTMO.



Aamer asked Kassem if he knew what “SOP” stands for. He replied, “Standard Operating Procedures,” but Aamer told him, “*($@& on Paper,” and told him that was the running joke amongst the prisoners, guards, and officers alike.



Shaking his head, and noting that he is now 46 years old, Aamer explained that in the last ten years, he has sat across the table from roughly 200 interrogators, and said, “Some of them were extremely experienced, older than 70 years of age.” However, neither they, nor the countless rotations of guards, have succeeded in breaking his spirit. As he said: “What keeps me happy, what keeps me alive, is that I haven’t surrendered. I tell the guards that even though they are putting shackles on me. I’m still a free man.”

http://www.cageprisoners.com/learn-more ... ger-strike

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All humans are dead except those who have knowledge; and all those who have knowledge are asleep, except those who do good deeds; and those who do good deeds are deceived, except those who are sincere; and those who are sincere are always in a state of worry
- Imam Shafi (r.a)



VISIT: !!!!!!
http://forums.islamicawakening.com/f47
http://freedetainees.org
http://aseerun.org
http://cageprisoners.com
http://hhugs.org.uk/


Wed Apr 11, 2012 8:23 am
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Your Chance to Make a difference - viewtopic.php?f=115&t=23897&start=25


Wed Apr 11, 2012 11:19 am
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Dr Aafia Siddiqui: 9th Anniversary

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Yvonne Ridley reviews the case of Aafia Siddiqui on the 9th anniversary since she first disappeared

I am an investigative journalist and as such details and facts provide the framework from which to build a story. That has been the premise from which I've worked now in this industry for nearly 40 years. It is the same premise from which some great investigative journalists have toiled as they sift through genuine documents, interview primary intelligence sources and delve into eye witnesses accounts to get to the truth of a matter. And it is the same premise from which Cageprisoners operates tirelessly in its pursuit to giving a voice to the voiceless. In the last few decades I've seen many good people sent down for crimes which they did not commit, especially during the so-called Irish Troubles which saw US dollar-funded terrorism wreak chaos and death in the streets of London as well as other major UK cities. During that period I've also seen the same wronged people being released from prison, poorly compensated for their terrible ordeals and miscarriages of justice often followed by a grovelling apologies from the police and Establishment. Groups like the Birmingham Six and the Guildford Four know the pain and injustice of being wrongly convicted and in some ways, while the truth eventually set them free, they will forever be haunted by their experiences and lost lives.


I pray I will live to see the day when the US apologises to all of those swept up in the War on Terror, held in dark, secret dungeons without charge or trial. I look forward to the day when American justice attempts to put right all of those it has wronged in the last decade. Perhaps none is more deserving than the academic and mother-of-three Dr Aafia Siddiqui who was given an 86-year sentence by a pompous little New York judge whose relationship with truth and justice is as long distance as is mine with quantum mechanics and classical physics.
Judge Richard Berman, either a legal minnow or a Bush marionette, allowed his courtroom to become the venue for a completely illegal show trial.

The facts are as outlined below:

The alleged crime happened in Afghanistan, a country with its own judicial system and - unless it is under official US occupation - the trial should have been held there.
The defendant, born in Pakistan and a citizen of that country, was denied access to consular officials in Afghanistan or New York for more than 30 days after being shot in July 2008 - this is a complete violation of the Vienna and Geneva conventions.
The defendant was interrogated by the FBI while heavily sedated hours after major surgery was performed in Bagram - this is in complete contravention of US and international laws.
One independent Afghan witness, a transator/guide for the FBI, was bribed with a green card and the promise of US citizenship to lie under oath in court.
Spent bullets removed by US investigators from the prison cell where the alleged crime took place, were subsequently lost while other crucial evidence was tampered with.
Evidence from a secret court hearing held in the USA in 2003 about Dr Aafia Siddiqui was not allowed to be introduced in Berman's kangaroo court. This evidence would have documented that US intelligence knew exactly where Dr Aafia Siddiqui was being held after her disappearance in 2003.
Berman refused to allow any evidence which would have shown that Dr Aafia Siddiqui was set up and subsequently shot in a bungled US intelligence operation in July 2008.
To the prosecution's credit - according to court transcripts and they're there for anyone to check - the lawyers for the US government stated loud and clear that Dr Aafia Siddiqui was not al Qaida, nor was she affiliated to any banned or terrorist organisation. This is a truth some authors and journalists refuse to accept, even though it came directly from the mouth of the chief prosecuting lawyer. Being a good journalist means accepting that there are times when you got it wrong ... peddling old lies and myths serves no one.The whole truth of the Dr Aafia Siddiqui case will come out, of that I am confident. I went to Ghazni with film-maker Hassan Ghani in 2008 and we interviewed and filmed key eye witnesses who to this day will state emphatically that Dr Aafia Siddiqui was shot at close range by US soldiers and, perhaps more crucially, they did so in panic after realising the frail, diminutive woman held in a cell was not hooded, cuffed or restrained. Not one single eye witness - from a local police chief to any of his men - saw Dr Aafia Siddiqui even attempt to pick up a gun and shoot at the US soldiers. We've all watched the CSI American hit TV series based on forensic evidence and science - well not one shred of 'CSI evidence' could be produced in Berman's court to put a gun in the defendant's hands. No gunshot residue was found either on her clothing or on her hands. She could not have fired a gun - the science doesn't lie but sadly some front row witnesses did.

Unfortunately the gaggle of US soldiers, whose evidence contradicted each other in court, covered up the real crime ... that at least one of their rank had shot an unarmed woman at close range. Tellingly, the reputation of the US military serving in Afghanistan is in tatters. Insitutionalised racism and Islamaphobia has spread like cancer in the ranks making them neither credible witnesses or men of honour. While it is unfair to demonise an entire military there are more than just a few rogue soldiers in the ranks of Uncle Sam. I did contact the Pentagon and asked the media spokesman if any of the soldiers who gave evidence in Berman's court against Dr Aafia Siddiqui were part of the notorious "kill team" - a bunch of lying, scuzzbuckets who shot Afghan civilians at random before hacking off their body parts as trophies. Now the Pentagon could have responded with a simple and definitive "no". That call never came and subsequent calls to the press office have since drawn a blank response. I invite other journalists to ask the same question.

On a point of interest most of the Kill Team were sent down for a handful of years with the ring leader given a life sentence and eligible for parole after 10 years for murdering an unknown number of Afghans. Dr Aafia Siddiqui got 86 years for allegedly shooting at soldiers in an incident in which no one but she was injured.

As I say, the truth will come out as long as journalists like myself continue to question, dig and demand to know what really happened to Dr Aafia Siddiqui.

We are now marking the 9th anniversary of her kidnap and false imprisonment and that of her three children. I am hoping this will be the last such anniversary to be marked with candles, prayers and vigils. Justice will prevail but let's hope sooner than later. And until it does Dr Aafia Siddiqui, a brilliant academic, is rotting away in a Texas jail.

* British journalist Yvonne Ridley is a patron of Cageprisoners.

http://www.cageprisoners.com/our-work/o ... nniversary

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Your Chance to Make a difference - viewtopic.php?f=115&t=23897&start=25


Thu Apr 12, 2012 12:03 pm
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just horrible, pray for these brothers and sisters...

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All humans are dead except those who have knowledge; and all those who have knowledge are asleep, except those who do good deeds; and those who do good deeds are deceived, except those who are sincere; and those who are sincere are always in a state of worry
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Thu Apr 12, 2012 2:01 pm
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''TAREK’S SENTENCING STATEMENT''


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Read to Judge O’Toole during his sentencing, April 12th 2012.
In the name of God the most gracious the most merciful
Exactly four years ago this month I was finishing my work shift at a local hospital. As I was walking to my car I was approached by two federal agents. They said that I had a choice to make: I could do things the easy way, or I could do them the hard way. The “easy “ way, as they explained, was that I would become an informant for the government, and if I did so I would never see the inside of a courtroom or a prison cell. As for the hard way, this is it. Here I am, having spent the majority of the four years since then in a solitary cell the size of a small closet, in which I am locked down for 23 hours each day. The FBI and these prosecutors worked very hard—and the government spent millions of tax dollars – to put me in that cell, keep me there, put me on trial, and finally to have me stand here before you today to be sentenced to even more time in a cell.
In the weeks leading up to this moment, many people have offered suggestions as to what I should say to you. Some said I should plead for mercy in hopes of a light sentence, while others suggested I would be hit hard either way. But what I want to do is just talk about myself for a few minutes.
When I refused to become an informant, the government responded by charging me with the “crime” of supporting the mujahideen fighting the occupation of Muslim countries around the world. Or as they like to call them, “terrorists.” I wasn’t born in a Muslim country, though. I was born and raised right here in America and this angers many people: how is it that I can be an American and believe the things I believe, take the positions I take? Everything a man is exposed to in his environment becomes an ingredient that shapes his outlook, and I’m no different. So, in more ways than one, it’s because of America that I am who I am.
When I was six, I began putting together a massive collection of comic books. Batman implanted a concept in my mind, introduced me to a paradigm as to how the world is set up: that there are oppressors, there are the oppressed, and there are those who step up to defend the oppressed. This resonated with me so much that throughout the rest of my childhood, I gravitated towards any book that reflected that paradigm – Uncle Tom’s Cabin, The Autobiography of Malcolm X, and I even saw an ethical dimension to The Catcher in the Rye.
By the time I began high school and took a real history class, I was learning just how real that paradigm is in the world. I learned about the Native Americans and what befell them at the hands of European settlers. I learned about how the descendents of those European settlers were in turn oppressed under the tyranny of King George III. I read about Paul Revere, Tom Paine, and how Americans began an armed insurgency against British forces – an insurgency we now celebrate as the American revolutionary war. As a kid I even went on school field trips just blocks away from where we sit now. I learned about Harriet Tubman, Nat Turner, John Brown, and the fight against slavery in this country. I learned about Emma Goldman, Eugene Debs, and the struggles of the labor unions, working class, and poor. I learned about Anne Frank, the Nazis, and how they persecuted minorities and imprisoned dissidents. I learned about Rosa Parks, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, and the civil rights struggle. I learned about Ho Chi Minh, and how the Vietnamese fought for decades to liberate themselves from one invader after another. I learned about Nelson Mandela and the fight against apartheid in South Africa. Everything I learned in those years confirmed what I was beginning to learn when I was six: that throughout history, there has been a constant struggle between the oppressed and their oppressors. With each struggle I learned about, I found myself consistently siding with the oppressed, and consistently respecting those who stepped up to defend them -regardless of nationality, regardless of religion. And I never threw my class notes away. As I stand here speaking, they are in a neat pile in my bedroom closet at home.
From all the historical figures I learned about, one stood out above the rest. I was impressed by many things about Malcolm X, but above all, I was fascinated by the idea of transformation, his transformation. I don’t know if you’ve seen the movie “X” by Spike Lee, it’s over three and a half hours long, and the Malcolm at the beginning is different from the Malcolm at the end. He starts off as an illiterate criminal, but ends up a husband, a father, a protective and eloquent leader for his people, a disciplined Muslim performing the Hajj in Makkah, and finally, a martyr. Malcolm’s life taught me that Islam is not something inherited; it’s not a culture or ethnicity. It’s a way of life, a state of mind anyone can choose no matter where they come from or how they were raised. This led me to look deeper into Islam, and I was hooked. I was just a teenager, but Islam answered the question that the greatest scientific minds were clueless about, the question that drives the rich & famous to depression and suicide from being unable to answer: what is the purpose of life? Why do we exist in this Universe? But it also answered the question of how we’re supposed to exist. And since there’s no hierarchy or priesthood, I could directly and immediately begin digging into the texts of the Qur’an and the teachings of Prophet Muhammad, to begin the journey of understanding what this was all about, the implications of Islam for me as a human being, as an individual, for the people around me, for the world; and the more I learned, the more I valued Islam like a piece of gold. This was when I was a teen, but even today, despite the pressures of the last few years, I stand here before you, and everyone else in this courtroom, as a very proud Muslim.
With that, my attention turned to what was happening to other Muslims in different parts of the world. And everywhere I looked, I saw the powers that be trying to destroy what I loved. I learned what the Soviets had done to the Muslims of Afghanistan. I learned what the Serbs had done to the Muslims of Bosnia. I learned what the Russians were doing to the Muslims of Chechnya. I learned what Israel had done in Lebanon – and what it continues to do in Palestine – with the full backing of the United States. And I learned what America itself was doing to Muslims. I learned about the Gulf War, and the depleted uranium bombs that killed thousands and caused cancer rates to skyrocket across Iraq. I learned about the American-led sanctions that prevented food, medicine, and medical equipment from entering Iraq, and how – according to the United Nations – over half a million children perished as a result. I remember a clip from a ‘60 Minutes’ interview of Madeline Albright where she expressed her view that these dead children were “worth it.” I watched on September 11th as a group of people felt driven to hijack airplanes and fly them into buildings from their outrage at the deaths of these children. I watched as America then attacked and invaded Iraq directly. I saw the effects of ‘Shock & Awe’ in the opening day of the invasion – the children in hospital wards with shrapnel from American missiles sticking out of their foreheads (of course, none of this was shown on CNN). I learned about the town of Haditha, where 24 Muslims – including a 76-year old man in a wheelchair, women, and even toddlers – were shot up and blown up in their bedclothes as the slept by US Marines. I learned about Abeer al-Janabi, a fourteen-year old Iraqi girl gang-raped by five American soldiers, who then shot her and her family in the head, then set fire to their corpses. I just want to point out, as you can see, Muslim women don’t even show their hair to unrelated men. So try to imagine this young girl from a conservative village with her dress torn off, being sexually assaulted by not one, not two, not three, not four, but five soldiers. Even today, as I sit in my jail cell, I read about the drone strikes which continue to kill Muslims daily in places like Pakistan, Somalia, and Yemen. Just last month, we all heard about the seventeen Afghan Muslims – mostly mothers and their kids – shot to death by an American soldier, who also set fire to their corpses. These are just the stories that make it to the headlines, but one of the first concepts I learned in Islam is that of loyalty, of brotherhood – that each Muslim woman is my sister, each man is my brother, and together, we are one large body who must protect each other. In other words, I couldn’t see these things beings done to my brothers & sisters – including by America – and remain neutral. My sympathy for the oppressed continued, but was now more personal, as was my respect for those defending them.
I mentioned Paul Revere – when he went on his midnight ride, it was for the purpose of warning the people that the British were marching to Lexington to arrest Sam Adams and John Hancock, then on to Concord to confiscate the weapons stored there by the Minuteman. By the time they got to Concord, they found the Minuteman waiting for them, weapons in hand. They fired at the British, fought them, and beat them. From that battle came the American Revolution. There’s an Arabic word to describe what those Minutemen did that day. That word is: JIHAD, and this is what my trial was about. All those videos and translations and childish bickering over ‘Oh, he translated this paragraph’ and ‘Oh, he edited that sentence,’ and all those exhibits revolved around a single issue: Muslims who were defending themselves against American soldiers doing to them exactly what the British did to America. It was made crystal clear at trial that I never, ever plotted to “kill Americans” at shopping malls or whatever the story was. The government’s own witnesses contradicted this claim, and we put expert after expert up on that stand, who spent hours dissecting my every written word, who explained my beliefs. Further, when I was free, the government sent an undercover agent to prod me into one of their little “terror plots,” but I refused to participate. Mysteriously, however, the jury never heard this.
So, this trial was not about my position on Muslims killing American civilians. It was about my position on Americans killing Muslim civilians, which is that Muslims should defend their lands from foreign invaders – Soviets, Americans, or Martians. This is what I believe. It’s what I’ve always believed, and what I will always believe. This is not terrorism, and it’s not extremism. it’s the simple logic of self-defense. It’s what the arrows on that seal above your head represent: defense of the homeland. So, I disagree with my lawyers when they say that you don’t have to agree with my beliefs – no. Anyone with commonsense and humanity has no choice but to agree with me. If someone breaks into your home to rob you and harm your family, logic dictates that you do whatever it takes to expel that invader from your home. But when that home is a Muslim land, and that invader is the US military, for some reason the standards suddenly change. Common sense is renamed “terrorism” and the people defending themselves against those who come to kill them from across the ocean become “the terrorists” who are “killing Americans.” The mentality that America was victimized with when British soldiers walked these streets 2 ½ centuries ago is the same mentality Muslims are victimized by as American soldiers walk their streets today. It’s the mentality of colonialism. When Sgt. Bales shot those Afghans to death last month, all of the focus in the media was on him—his life, his stress, his PTSD, the mortgage on his home—as if he was the victim. Very little sympathy was expressed for the people he actually killed, as if they’re not real, they’re not humans. Unfortunately, this mentality trickles down to everyone in society, whether or not they realize it. Even with my lawyers, it took nearly two years of discussing, explaining, and clarifying before they were finally able to think outside the box and at least ostensibly accept the logic in what I was saying. Two years! If it took that long for people so intelligent, whose job it is to defend me, to de-program themselves, then to throw me in front of a randomly selected jury under the premise that they’re my “impartial peers,” I mean, come on. I wasn’t tried before a jury of my peers because with the mentality gripping America today, I have no peers. Counting on this fact, the government prosecuted me – not because they needed to, but simply because they could.
I learned one more thing in history class: America has historically supported the most unjust policies against its minorities – practices that were even protected by the law – only to look back later and ask: ‘what were we thinking?’ Slavery, Jim Crow, the internment of the Japanese during World War II – each was widely accepted by American society, each was defended by the Supreme Court. But as time passed and America changed, both people and courts looked back and asked ‘What were we thinking?’ Nelson Mandela was considered a terrorist by the South African government, and given a life sentence. But time passed, the world changed, they realized how oppressive their policies were, that it was not he who was the terrorist, and they released him from prison. He even became president. So, everything is subjective – even this whole business of “terrorism” and who is a “terrorist.” It all depends on the time and place and who the superpower happens to be at the moment.
In your eyes, I’m a terrorist, I’m the only one standing here in an orange jumpsuit and it’s perfectly reasonable that I be standing here in an orange jumpsuit. But one day, America will change and people will recognize this day for what it is. They will look at how hundreds of thousands of Muslims were killed and maimed by the US military in foreign countries, yet somehow I’m the one going to prison for “conspiring to kill and maim” in those countries – because I support the Mujahidin defending those people. They will look back on how the government spent millions of dollars to imprison me as a “terrorist,” yet if we were to somehow bring Abeer al-Janabi back to life in the moment she was being gang-raped by your soldiers, to put her on that witness stand and ask her who the “terrorists” are, she sure wouldn’t be pointing at me.
The government says that I was obsessed with violence, obsessed with “killing Americans.” But, as a Muslim living in these times, I can think of a lie no more ironic.
-Tarek Mehanna
4/12/12

Source: http://www.freetarek.com/tareks-sentencing-statement/

======================================

Masha'Allah one of the best speeches i've ever read, brought me goosebumps, May Allah(SWT) free the oppressed. Ameen.

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All humans are dead except those who have knowledge; and all those who have knowledge are asleep, except those who do good deeds; and those who do good deeds are deceived, except those who are sincere; and those who are sincere are always in a state of worry
- Imam Shafi (r.a)



VISIT: !!!!!!
http://forums.islamicawakening.com/f47
http://freedetainees.org
http://aseerun.org
http://cageprisoners.com
http://hhugs.org.uk/


Sat Apr 14, 2012 9:21 am
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Unread post Re: Your Chance to Make a difference
Allahu Akbar, mashaAllah! Ameen!

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Your Chance to Make a difference - viewtopic.php?f=115&t=23897&start=25


Sat Apr 14, 2012 12:47 pm
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Unread post Re: Your Chance to Make a difference
One more site, from Germany, for supporting brothers and sisters in prisons

http://www.ansarul-aseer.com/

For those who would like to write them, a letter must be in German.

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Your Chance to Make a difference - viewtopic.php?f=115&t=23897&start=25


Mon Apr 16, 2012 1:42 am
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Unread post Re: Your Chance to Make a difference
excellent work sis Bosnevie

Scimi


Mon Apr 16, 2012 8:08 pm
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Unread post Re: Your Chance to Make a difference
Salam~

Masya Allah... :'(

Jazakillahu khair for the infos and for spreading awareness of this. May their faith and love for Allah forever endure, Aamiin!

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اللَّهُمَّ صَلِّ عَلَى مُحَمَّدٍ وَعَلَى آلِ مُحَمَّدٍ


Wed Apr 18, 2012 4:56 pm
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Unread post Re: Your Chance to Make a difference
wall.flower183 wrote:
Salam~

Masya Allah... :'(

Jazakillahu khair for the infos and for spreading awareness of this. May their faith and love for Allah forever endure, Aamiin!


Ameen sister wall.flower183 :)

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Your Chance to Make a difference - viewtopic.php?f=115&t=23897&start=25


Thu Apr 19, 2012 1:07 am
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